Alexandra K. Diem

Personal Website.
"Hiking is an excellent opportunity to scout out backcountry skiing routes while we wait for winter to come back."
During the Besseggen hike we got to check out the first sections of the Jotunheimen Høgruta #hauteroute from afar and I can only imagine what an awesome exciting winter adventure this will make!
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#hiking #utpåtur #friluftsliv #turjenter #fjelltur #soveute #fjellsport #allemannsretten #besseggen #jotunheimen #nowaynorway Big boulder. Benoit for scale.
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#hiking #utpåtur #friluftsliv #turjenter #fjelltur #soveute #fjellsport #allemannsretten #besseggen #jotunheimen #nowaynorway Jotunheimen needs no filter.
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#hiking #utpåtur #friluftsliv #turjenter #fjelltur #soveute #fjellsport #allemannsretten #besseggen #jotunheimen #nowaynorway "Only about 30 switchbacks left!"
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📷 @pvlvs
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#mitziandfriends #radrace #tourdefriends #tourdefriends3 #tdf #storyoftheday #oneobsession #photooftheday #worldbybike #outsideisfree #fromwhereiride #cycling #womencycling #ladieseditioncc #landevei #utno #vegtur

Clean up dangling images from Docker

I almost exclusively run FEniCS using Docker and have recently noticed that building images from Dockerfiles often results in a lot of <none>:<none> images showing up when I run docker images. This is different from images labelled the same showing up when running docker images -a (in that case they are “intermediate” images since Docker images are composed of layers).

The <none>:<none> images that show up when running docker images are references to old images after for example updating an image since updating an image does not actually update it, but creates a new image for the new version and leaves the old one dangling as a <none>:<none>. Docker does not have its own garbage collection, so this has to be done manually using the following terminal command.